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Posts tagged ‘Thanksgiving’

13
Sep

Time for Autumn Clean Up!

When it comes to preparing my house for the influx of relatives and friends that are coming over to feast for the holidays, I am totally meticulous in my cleaning ritual. I clean things that during the rest of the year might not get the attention it deserves, like the top of cabinets and the cabinets under the sink.

It’s not that I think people will stand on a step stool to check how my dust bunnies are faring on top of the cabinets, and I don’t envision the kitchen sink cabinet being opened up long enough for anyone to notice the ring of dish-washing liquid that *may* be there from when the bottle tipped over, but you just never know.

I use a lot of Kimberly-Clark wipes during this time. LOTS. I would probably be shot by an activist group that monitors such things as amount of disposable paper-towel type things, but in my defense, it’s only twice a year that I do this. And I support all efforts to sustain the environment, just sayin’. But I love me some WypAll’s.

I also used Kimwipes on all my electronics and even everyone’s eyeglasses and sunglasses. They are especially made for delicate jobs like that, and I don’t want anything messing up my TV and computer screens! They are also great for smartphones and tablets. In my kitchen, I use the X80 foodservice towels. Nothing really beats the absorbency when it comes to drying dishes and utensils and getting them seriously dry.  Good luck with your own holiday cleaning!

21
Nov

Wacky Wednesday Trivia, the Thanksgiving Edition!

Wacky Wednesday Trivia, the Thanksgiving Edition!

Its Wednesday everyone, and you know what that means! Yes, it’s trivia day here at ReStockIt, so put on your learning caps and absorb something new. Today it’s going to be all about Thanksgiving, since it’s tomorrow (yay! Turkey day coma, here I come!) and everyone will be stuffing their faces around the dinner table and giving thanks for whatever they are thankful for.

I managed to come up with some funny trivia, and some actual scholarly trivia, so there is something for everyone! Read on, enjoy, and have a fantastic holiday!

  1. The traditional cornucopia was a curved goat’s horn filled to brim with fruits and grains. According to Greek legend, Amalthea (a goat) broke one of her horns and offered it to Greek God Zeus as a sign of reverence. As a sign of gratitude, Zeus later set the goat’s image in the sky also known as constellation Capricorn. Cornucopia is the most common symbol of a harvest festival. A Horn shaped container, it is filled with abundance of the Earth’s harvest. It is also known as the ‘horn of plenty’.
  2. Turducken, a turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken, is becoming more popular in Thanksgiving (originated in Louisiana). A turducken is a de-boned turkey stuffed with a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed with a small de-boned chicken. The cavity of the chicken and the rest of the gaps are filled with, at the very least, a highly seasoned breadcrumb mixture (although some versions have a different stuffing for each bird).
  3. Fossil evidence shows that turkeys roamed the Americas 10 million years ago.
  4. There are regional differences as to the “stuffing” (or “dressing”) traditionally served with the turkey. Southerners generally make theirs from cornbread, while in other parts of the country white bread is the base. One or several of the following may be added: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, celery and/or other vegetables, sausage or the turkey’s giblets.
  5. Thomas Jefferson thought the concept of Thanksgiving was “the most ridiculous idea I’ve ever heard.”
  6. Benjamin Franklin wanted the national bird to be a turkey.
  7. The first large helium-filled balloon in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade was of Felix the Cat in 1927.
  8. Several people wanted to have an official day of thanksgiving, including George Washington, who proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving in 1789. Several people did not want it including President Thomas Jefferson.
  9. A spooked turkey can run at speeds up to 20 miles per hour. They can also burst into flight approaching speeds between 50-55 mph in a matter of seconds.
  10. The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade was held in 1924. It featured Central Park zoo animals, people in costumes, and floats.

Photo Credits:
freebies.about.com
en.wikipedia.org
wildlife.state.nh.us
simplyrecipes.com
dailyblowhole.wordpress.com
jumpedonthebandwagonlate.wordpress.com
20
Nov

Our Lives in Pictures

When I was 13 years old, I got a Canon Sure Shot for my birthday. I was so excited, for many reasons, but the biggest reason was that it took 35mm film. I had always loved taking pictures, whether in front or behind the lens, but I was always relegated to 110 film, Polaroids, or *gasp* disc film! Remember disc film? Terrible photos from them…

Anyway, I felt so adult when I opened the back of my new camera and attempted to load the film. I put on this air of self-confidence that I was NOT feeling, but figured I’d fake it till I made it. To be honest, I was scared to death. I knew the dangers of 35mm film (which makes digital cameras a blessing) – unwinding too much and not having it catch the spindles correctly, not unwinding enough and having to open the back and hoping not to expose the film, or horror of horrors – exposing the film. In my house, that was a life-ending mistake. We took photos very seriously.

So there I was, attempting to load my first cartridge of film, with the whole family watching me expectantly, and I carefully pulled out the little tongue of extra cellulose acetate, lined up the perforations with the spindle in the camera, and took a deep breath. I closed the camera back, and heard the satisfactory whir of the film loading into the camera. Or so I thought.

Once I took the whole roll of film, listening every time to the camera advance to the next frame, I went into my room. I was paranoid and figured it was darker in there than the rest of the house and it might help the film. Well, I opened the back, and the film was still in the same position as when I loaded it. It damaged me for the next two years. I wouldn’t touch another 35mm camera.

In 10th grade, I ended up on the yearbook staff, and my first 35mm Canon SLR was placed in my hand. I had to swallow my fear of film (I couldn’t go around to the other photographers asking them to load my film every time), but me and that camera were inseparable for the next 3 years.

With the exception of one other camera in my collection, I have always had Canons. Maybe it’s allegiance to the first “real” camera I ever had, or just because I feel they are superior to any other brand, but I know that I will always have a Canon camera. My digital EOS is like my child, and I only bring it out on special occasions or when I’m going out shooting something in particular. I also still have a Canon point and shoot 35mm, but it’s pretty much retired unless I want a retro feel.

With the holidays coming, flashes are going off all over the place (but thankfully not flash bulbs), and people are embracing their favorite camera. Whether you’re a Canon fan or not, I hope you take many a beautiful picture of you and yours, and enjoy the holidays!

Photo Credit:
http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/
19
Nov

It’s All About the Soap

With the holidays approaching with the speed of light, prep is underway in houses across the country. Floors are being scrubbed, walls are being washed, and counter tops are being disinfected. With all this cleaning, your hands are taking a beating. If yours are anything like mine, they get dry, cracked, and red looking, and no amount of lotion seems to work for them.

That’s why I like Softsoap. First off, it’s made by Colgate-Palmolive, the minds behind…Palmolive! I remember my mother using Palmolive when I was a kid, because it really did help her hands while washing dishes (this was before dishwashers were prevalent in houses) and they didn’t dry out like they would using other liquid dish washing soap.

I keep Softsoap in my kitchen, in my bathroom, and at the sink in the laundry room, and each one is a different scent. I alternate between the foam and liquid, depending on my mood, and I try to keep a manlier scent in my bathroom for the hubby, since he says he doesn’t like his hands to smell like lavender. I can’t think why not…

They also have different formulas that you can choose from, whether you want anti-bacterial, Kitchen Fresh, or their Pampered Hands line. Plus, the bottle are really attractive and you wouldn’t be ashamed to have them sitting on your counter! Stock up for the holidays, because there will be hand washing!

15
Nov

Plastic Plates and Their Many Uses

Thanksgiving is a week away, and in schools all across the country, paper plates are being used to make turkey-related crafts. I think plastic plates would be a better choice. I know, paper is better for the environment, but plastic will keep in an attic trunk a lot better than a paper memento. Plus, if some huge plate catastrophe strikes your home, and your car breaks down and you can’t get to the store, you can always clean up a plastic plate and reuse it! I know, I’m reaching.

With plastic plates, you know that the turkey, stuffing, casseroles, cranberry sauce, etc won’t dump into your lap, and you really can hand wash plastic plates and use them again, preferably without a frame of dry spaghetti around the rim from your child’s craft at school.Also, they’re elegant and have style so they are more appropriate for a holiday dinner.

Plastic plates are also handy in a pinch for games and sports. A fairly heavy-duty plate can substitute for a frisbee, and if you use a dry-erase marker, you can use a plastic plate to play tic-tac-toe or hangman. They make great hats too, that you can staple ribbons and bows (or tape toilet paper to them) for baby showers and bridal showers. See? There are so many things you can use a plastic plate for!

Photo Credit:
auntannie.com
crayola.com
forums.onewed.com
creativejewishmom.com
14
Nov

Is 3 A.M. Too Early to Shop? NO!

What possesses sane, normal people to wake up from a turkey-induced coma, throw on some semblance of clothing (most people just stay in their jammies though), and shuffle out into the cold, dark early morning hours? Not the threat of nuclear war, or a zombie invasion, but shopping. Shopping, shopping, shopping! Awesome deals, deep discounts, and the competition.

You know it as well as I do. There is something visceral about snatching the last video game, or computer, or Elmo doll out from under someone’s grasping fingers and knowing that you were the victor in that battle. You were faster, you were more observant, and they lost. You win!

With Black Friday getting closer and closer (not to mention T-Day) this wacky Wednesday trivia is all about the best shopping day of the year. Enjoy, be safe, don’t go crazy and get your shopping shoes ready!

  • Black Friday is called that because it is the most profitable day of the year for retailers everywhere (followed closely by Cyber Monday for e-commerce)
  • The term Black Friday was first used to refer to the shopping day after Thanksgiving in 1961…
  • …But it originated in 1869 during the financial crisis that occurred on Friday
  • The first city police department to have a problem with Black Friday shoppers was Philadelphia
  • The shopping rush on Black Friday is responsible for at least one death, and many injuries.
  • This is the only holiday, which is not made official and yet celebrated as a holiday. And retailers run midnight sales to attract customers.
  • 2008 was the only year that saw a plunge in the sales of electronics in the Black Friday history.

Photo Credits:
blackfriday.bradsdeals.com
technologytell.com
gift-ideas.toptenreviews.com
chzmemebase.wordpress.com
social.dol.gov
7
Nov

November Trivia Time!

November Trivia Time!

It’s November, month of Thanksgiving…and other things. November is Election Day, Thanksgiving day, Black Friday, and the time when most of the leaves have all fallen from the trees. People are in full preparation for winter if you haven’t already had your first snows, and even Florida is starting to cool down (it’s a balmy 74 degrees here today). The kids are still plowing through their Halloween candy, with the help of their parents, and Thanksgiving committees are starting to crop up at work (here, anyway).

So sit back, read on, and learn some things about our 11th month that you maybe didn’t know, like the fact that it was the ninth month in the Roman calendar.

  • In Finland they call November “Marraskuu” which translates as “month of the dead”.
  • November 1st is celebrated in the Catholic faith as All Saints Day
  • The Saxons called November “Blood Month” because they sacrificed many animals to their gods in that   month
  • World War I ended on the 11th day of the 11th month at 11PM, in 1918
  • On November 5th, 1959 the American Football League was formed with 8 teams: the Houston OIlers, New York Titans, Buffalo Bills, Boston Patriots, Los Angeles Chargers, Dallas Texans, Oakland Raiders, and the Denver Broncos.
  • The infamous Berlin Wall began to come down on November 9th, 1989
  • November is NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month
  • Around November 17th, the Leonids metero shower reaches its peak
  • November in the Northern Hemisphere is the seasonal equivalent to May in the Southern Hemisphere,  and vice versa

And the original Thanksgiving Dinner probably consisted of this (nothing like today’s dinner, except the turkey):

  • Roasted whole turkey
  • Roasted duck
  • Roasted goose or Passenger Pigeons
  • Roasted venison
  • Fish, shellfish, mussels, oysters, etc
  • Whole pumpkins, bake in coals, along with one or two other winter squashes. Could also have been boiled.
  • Beans
  • Dried corn, boiled in water
  • Flat bread, or “fry” bread
  • Baskets of nuts and fall berries
  • Pumpkin sweetened with honey
  • Boiled corn meal sweetened with honey

Special thanks to the Smithsonian for their menu example: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Ask-an-Expert-What-was-on-the-menu-at-the-first-Thanksgiving.html
5
Nov

Fall Cleaning for the Holidays

When it comes to preparing my house for the influx of relatives and friends that are coming over to feast for Thanksgiving, I am totally meticulous in my cleaning ritual. I clean things that during the rest of the year might not get the attention it deserves, like the top of cabinets and the cabinets under the sink.

It’s not that I think people will stand on a step stool to check how my dust bunnies are faring on top of the cabinets, and I don’t envision the kitchen sink cabinet being opened up long enough for anyone to notice the ring of dish-washing liquid that *may* be there from when the bottle tipped over, but you just never know.

I use a lot of Kimberly-Clark wipes during this time. LOTS. I would probably be shot by an activist group that monitors such things as amount of disposable paper-towel type things, but in my defense, it’s only twice a year that I do this. And I support all efforts to sustain the environment, just sayin’. But I love me some WypAll’s.

I also used Kimwipes on all my electronics and even everyone’s eyeglasses and sunglasses. They are especially made for delicate jobs like that, and I don’t want anything messing up my TV and computer screens! They are also great for smartphones and tablets. In my kitchen, I use the X80 foodservice towels. Nothing really beats the absorbency when it comes to drying dishes and utensils and getting them seriously dry.  Good luck with your own holiday cleaning!

21
Sep

Happy Fall Ya’ll!!

Well, a day early anyway, but since I’m not here on Saturday’s and Sunday’s to write this wonderful blog, I figured its better early than late. And since this is my absolute favorite time of the year, I thought, Hey! What a great blog to write!

There is just something perfect about autumn. In September, the temperatures are just right (well…not here, but in other places), and you get that slight chill in the morning and a lovely breeze at night. Air conditioners get turned off (again, not here. You’d melt) and windows get opened. Humidity drops and mums and pansies crop up on porch planters, along with corn stalks and gourds. Leaves start turning into the scarlets, golds, and oranges that turn hillsides into gorgeous paintings of bright color.

The other thing I love about autumn is firepits. In October’s past, some of my best nights have been sitting around a fire with friends, light jackets and the heat of the fire offering protection from the brisk night air. Ghost stories around a firepit on Halloween night are just something that has to be experienced..especially if your firepit is bordered by a deep, dark, spooky forest. In October, ghosts hang from trees, jack-o-lanterns glare at you from front porches and stoops, and on one fun night, little goblins and ghuolies rush from house to house, looking for sweet treats.

November is a time for football and Thanksgiving! What other month do you get a pass to eat as much as you want, turn on the TV to watch a football game, and then fall asleep? Well, without recrimination, anyway. Leaves are burning in piles outside, putting the smell of burning wood in the air. The nights get even cooler, and most likely you will have to scrape frost off your car windows in the morning. Thanksgiving comes and you eat like a glutton. Then Black Friday comes and you waddle to the stores at 4 A.M., still full from your midnight snack, and shop like a glutton.

I tell ya, fall is just about the best season. Outdoor activities aren’t impeded by bugs and sweat, and inside activities consist of crafting and baking. What more could a person ask for? Not much more, I can tell you that! What are you doing to make this a great fall season?

Photo Credit:
stmawt.org
bplolinenews.blogspot.com
feeltheambiance.com
thecraftyhostess.com
hosted.verticalresponse.com
webs.com
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